The BD programme is cumulative and developmental as indicated below. Participants can, however, exit with awards at the different levels. These levels correspond to the Scottish Qualification and Credit Framework where Level 7 is first year at University, Level 8 second year and so on.

Level 7 (Certificate)

Tuition Fee £5450/year

The first year aims to provide a broad foundation in several key disciplines including biblical interpretation, Christian doctrine, church history and areas of practical theology. Students are engaged in interactive learning and supported throughout the first year to ensure they are gaining confidence in the subject areas.

Module Module price / Audit Price Start Date Levels

Encountering the Bible

£900 / £250

Sept 2018

7 & 8

Encountering the Bible

Start Date: Sept 2018
Levels: 7 & 8

For personal use, public ministry, and Christian witness Christian people are concerned to handle the Bible correctly.

This module will provide you with a broad, wide-ranging approach to the Bible. Key areas of study include:

  • how the Bible is interpreted
  • the importance of translational choices
  • the significance of historical and cultural context from which a text emerged, and within which it is now being interpreted

Attention will also be paid to the importance of literary genres such as:

  • Wisdom
  • Historical
  • Narrative
  • Poetry
  • Gospel
  • Letter
  • Apocalypse

and how the nature of the genre affects interpretation.

In taking this course learn important skills and techniques which underlie responsible and informed interpretation.

Faith Seeking Understanding

£900 / £250

Sept 2018

7 & 8

Faith Seeking Understanding

Start Date: Sept 2018
Levels: 7 & 8

This module provides an introduction to Christian Doctrine as ‘faith seeking understanding’.

The module is built around a course text book and is intended to give you a firm grounding in the major themes and structure of Christian theology.

Major themes covered include the doctrine of:

  • Triune God
  • Creation
  • Scripture
  • Humanity
  • Person of Christ
  • Atonement
  • Holy Spirit
  • Church
  • Christian eschatology

There will also be a brief introduction to the relationship between Christian faith in Christ and relationships to other world religious traditions.

Wider reading and exploration through class discussion will enable you to build your own theological framework by interacting, both appreciatively and critically, with the insights and experiences of others. Theological discussion takes place where views will differ, and an important aspect of this module is to train students to be open to revision in their own views, and not closed to the views of others.

Preaching

£900 / £250

Sept 2018

7 & 8

Preaching

Start Date: Sept 2018
Levels: 7 & 8

This module will introduce you to the history, theology, and practice of Christian preaching as a particular genre of Christian communication related mainly to Christian ministry. The primary focus will be upon preaching as a ‘live event’ which takes place in the context of a congregation gathered in worship.

You will be introduced to the terms exegesis, hermeneutics, and homiletics and the way in which these activities are brought together in moving from Scriptural text to sermon. You will have the opportunity to work with a number of texts and consider preaching from these texts in relation to matters of:

  • Communication
  • Content
  • Context
  • Clarity
  • Creativity
  • Character

In relation to these you will consider issues of listening to your listeners, sermon form, illustration, use of technology, and embodied oral delivery.

By the end of the module students should be able to work from a text to a written and then delivered sermon according to a number of the principles and practices which are associated with good preaching.

As part of this process students will receive formative peer and tutor feedback on a sermon delivered in class.

Christian Ethics

£900 / £250

Sept 2018

7 & 8

Christian Ethics

Start Date: Sept 2018
Levels: 7 & 8

Christian people frequently ask: What should be done?

This module offers an introductory treatment of Christian Ethics. It does not assume prior knowledge in this field of study. The course brings together theory and practice. It outlines a number of traditional approaches to difficult issues and considers how these might be applied in ethical decision making.

A number of the sources for ethical decision making are evaluated such as:

  • human reason
  • Bible
  • tradition
  • conscience
  • experience
  • law

You will explore a range of contemporary ethical issues including abortion, divorce and remarriage, ecology, economics, assisted suicide, technology and privacy, just war theory and peacemaking, and human sexuality.

Throughout the course you will be challenged to consider your own ethical standpoints and commitments and to develop sympathy for contrary positions.

Practice of Pastoral Care

£900 / £250

Sept 2018

7 & 8

Practice of Pastoral Care

Start Date: Sept 2018
Levels: 7 & 8

This module will explore from a biblical and theological basis the basic principles and practices of Christian pastoral care, using biblical text, historical examples and contemporary case studies.

Spiritual and pastoral caring can be described as the expression of the love of God towards others, in action and relationship, communally and individually.

Accordingly pastoral care will be introduced as a ministry of faith, hope and love, based on the cardinal virtues which seeks to:

  • enable trustfulness and nourish faith
  • strengthen hopefulness by encouragement
  • build personal affirmation by acts and attitudes of faithful love.

Such dispositions as:

  • imaginative compassion
  • thoughtful accompaniment
  • affective empathy
  • generous inclusiveness
  • consistent faithfulness
  • vocational integrity
  • confidentiality and discretion

will be considered as those qualities which create and sustain the relational and communal environment from which Christian pastoral practices grow.

The specific areas of Pastoral Practice which will be discussed include:

  • accompanying the dying and bereaved
  • care for the depressed person
  • celebrating love and marriage
  • incarnational visitation
  • pastoral prayer
  • spiritual friendship
  • means of grace such as Bible, public worship, Holy Communion and baptism.

Listening to Scripture

£900 / £250

Sept 2018

7 & 8

Listening to Scripture

Start Date: Sept 2018
Levels: 7 & 8

This module will introduce you to biblical interpretation by examining closely selected biblical texts.

A variety of texts will be studied in relation to literary and historical context, genre, setting and theology.

The passages will also be set in the wider biblical context, and approaches to how they might be preached explored.

The systematic exegesis of selected passages involves using commentaries, biblical reference tools, theological resources and course notes as provided.

Text-based class discussion is a significant element in the learning process. You will be expected to prepare for each class by consulting commentaries, set reading of articles and books, use of class notes, and therefore be able to participate in the interpretative task. In seminars and tutorials significant critical issues and exegetical options raised by study of the text will be discussed in an open forum of informed interpretation.

Christian Leadership

£900 / £250

Sept 2018

7 & 8

Christian Leadership

Start Date: Sept 2018
Levels: 7 & 8

‘Leadership – what is it? How do you do it? Who is a leader? Who is not?’
(Walter Wright, Relational Leadership, xi, 2000).

This module introduces the core issues of Christian leadership as exercised within a variety of ministry contexts. Models of leadership derived from a variety of sources including the Bible, business and the voluntary sector will be considered. A variety of leadership styles will be examined and evaluated for their potential usefulness in pastoral ministry.

You will be helped to consider the pitfalls and challenges of church pastoral leadership and how these can be anticipated with compensating strategies. There will be discussion of leadership integrity, particularly the personal qualities of a leader in a faith community and whether it is possible to lead others in ways the leader has not attained. This will allow for consideration of what it means to lead within an ethical framework, ethics applying both to the leader and the practice of non-manipulative leadership.

Through case studies you will explore the challenges of Christian leadership in a faith community, exploring how to grow as a leader in skills and effectiveness. The course will offer the opportunity to critically reflect on the challenges of leadership in situations such as church meetings (business, deacons’, ministry team, etc.), the leader as exemplar in worship, pastoral care, relational integrity.

Worship

£900 / £250

Sept 2018

7 & 8

Worship

Start Date: Sept 2018
Levels: 7 & 8

This module will introduce you to the biblical and theological foundations, history, and practice of Christian worship.

Consideration will be given to Old Testament and New Testament worship practices, and then to a number of the predominant ways in which the Christian community has carried out its worship and why. This will include recognition of the influence not least on current British evangelical practice of the liturgical movement, charismatic movement, technology, and the post-modern.

Learning then moves on to explore the dynamics of a worship service in relation to such features as:

  • architecture and symbol
  • location and practicalities
  • revelation and response
  • gathering and sending
  • Word and Sacrament
  • the various ‘acts’ that comprise an ‘act’ of worship
  • the nature of participation
  • and the possibilities and limitations of singing

Attention is also given to specific acts of worship such as communion, baptism, marriage, infant dedication and funeral services.

In taking this course, participants will visit and review in relation to history, theology, movement, rhythm, symbol, and various acts, a worship service from a Christian tradition other than their own.

Level 8 (Diploma)

Tuition Fee £5450/year

Students continue to add to their knowledge and understanding by engaging with subjects such as Baptist identity (or equivalent studies in another Christian tradition), biblical studies, pastoral theology, preaching, mission and Christianity and culture. Several modules include off campus visits and opportunities to reflect on lived experience. Work Based Learning module enables students to engage with and reflect on service in a specific context.

Module Module price / Audit Price Start Date Levels

Baptist Identity

Baptist Identity

This module will identify significant developments in Baptist history in relation to: Continental Anabaptism, British, Scottish, European, and Global developments. This will inform you of the radical tradition that emerges out of a Baptist committment to Christ, the Bible and the Free Church tradition.

In giving attention to significant events and personalities you will get the opportunity to engage with a limited number of source texts.

In turn participants will explore a number of Baptist convictions and practices emerging from this Free Church tradition of living under the ‘rule of Christ’. These include:

  • the believers’ church
  • believers’ baptism
  • communal discernment
  • mission and evangelism
  • freedom of religion
  • and dissident and prophetic engagement

Such topics will be considered in relation to embodied examples and practical implications not least in relation to the British and in particular Scottish Baptist context of church life.

Faith Seeking Understanding

Faith Seeking Understanding

This module provides an introduction to Christian Doctrine as ‘faith seeking understanding’.

The module is built around a course text book and is intended to give you a firm grounding in the major themes and structure of Christian theology.

Major themes covered include the doctrine of:

  • Triune God
  • Creation
  • Scripture
  • Humanity
  • Person of Christ
  • Atonement
  • Holy Spirit
  • Church
  • Christian eschatology

There will also be a brief introduction to the relationship between Christian faith in Christ and relationships to other world religious traditions.

Wider reading and exploration through class discussion will enable you to build your own theological framework by interacting, both appreciatively and critically, with the insights and experiences of others. Theological discussion takes place where views will differ, and an important aspect of this module is to train students to be open to revision in their own views, and not closed to the views of others.

Preaching

Preaching

This module will introduce you to the history, theology, and practice of Christian preaching as a particular genre of Christian communication related mainly to Christian ministry. The primary focus will be upon preaching as a ‘live event’ which takes place in the context of a congregation gathered in worship.

You will be introduced to the terms exegesis, hermeneutics, and homiletics and the way in which these activities are brought together in moving from Scriptural text to sermon. You will have the opportunity to work with a number of texts and consider preaching from these texts in relation to matters of:

  • Communication
  • Content
  • Context
  • Clarity
  • Creativity
  • Character

In relation to these you will consider issues of listening to your listeners, sermon form, illustration, use of technology, and embodied oral delivery.

By the end of the module students should be able to work from a text to a written and then delivered sermon according to a number of the principles and practices which are associated with good preaching.

As part of this process students will receive formative peer and tutor feedback on a sermon delivered in class.

Work Based Learning and Theological Reflection

Work Based Learning and Theological Reflection

This is a placement based module giving students the opportunity to integrate and reflect upon faith and practice in a Work Based Learning context.

This module normally spreads over the twelve teaching weeks of one semester.

Included at the outset will pre-WBL Seminars in which you will be introduced to theological reflection through Journal writing.

The WBL environment will normally be a local church or other appropriate vocational context and the Placement will be supervised by an approved College Supervisor.

Through engaging in a number of practical and vocational tasks, either accompanying the Supervisor or working under their guidance, you will be introduced to some of the routine and core tasks related to their vocational ‘ministry’ aspirations.

However WBL 1 is about more than learning how to do; it aims to provide you with basic skills in reflective practice, self and other awareness in a ministry context, and a capacity to be self-critical and begin to understand the importance of self management.

A Learning Agreement will be negotiated incorporating the overall aims of the Placement, and its terms fulfilled within the WBL experience, including a written project, a Journal, a formative Supervisor’s Report and an end of WBL interview.

With respect to the Journal and in order to meet engagement requirements you will be expected to submit weekly journal entries via the UWS VLE and will receive formative feedback on these entries allowing them to be changed and developed prior to the final submission of a hard copy for summative assessment.

Practice of Pastoral Care

Practice of Pastoral Care

This module will explore from a biblical and theological basis the basic principles and practices of Christian pastoral care, using biblical text, historical examples and contemporary case studies.

Spiritual and pastoral caring can be described as the expression of the love of God towards others, in action and relationship, communally and individually.

Accordingly pastoral care will be introduced as a ministry of faith, hope and love, based on the cardinal virtues which seeks to:

  • enable trustfulness and nourish faith
  • strengthen hopefulness by encouragement
  • build personal affirmation by acts and attitudes of faithful love.

Such dispositions as:

  • imaginative compassion
  • thoughtful accompaniment
  • affective empathy
  • generous inclusiveness
  • consistent faithfulness
  • vocational integrity
  • confidentiality and discretion

will be considered as those qualities which create and sustain the relational and communal environment from which Christian pastoral practices grow.

The specific areas of Pastoral Practice which will be discussed include:

  • accompanying the dying and bereaved
  • care for the depressed person
  • celebrating love and marriage
  • incarnational visitation
  • pastoral prayer
  • spiritual friendship
  • means of grace such as Bible, public worship, Holy Communion and baptism.

Listening to Scripture

Listening to Scripture

This module will introduce you to biblical interpretation by examining closely selected biblical texts.

A variety of texts will be studied in relation to literary and historical context, genre, setting and theology.

The passages will also be set in the wider biblical context, and approaches to how they might be preached explored.

The systematic exegesis of selected passages involves using commentaries, biblical reference tools, theological resources and course notes as provided.

Text-based class discussion is a significant element in the learning process. You will be expected to prepare for each class by consulting commentaries, set reading of articles and books, use of class notes, and therefore be able to participate in the interpretative task. In seminars and tutorials significant critical issues and exegetical options raised by study of the text will be discussed in an open forum of informed interpretation.

Worship

Worship

This module will introduce you to the biblical and theological foundations, history, and practice of Christian worship.

Consideration will be given to Old Testament and New Testament worship practices, and then to a number of the predominant ways in which the Christian community has carried out its worship and why. This will include recognition of the influence not least on current British evangelical practice of the liturgical movement, charismatic movement, technology, and the post-modern.

Learning then moves on to explore the dynamics of a worship service in relation to such features as:

  • architecture and symbol
  • location and practicalities
  • revelation and response
  • gathering and sending
  • Word and Sacrament
  • the various ‘acts’ that comprise an ‘act’ of worship
  • the nature of participation
  • and the possibilities and limitations of singing

Attention is also given to specific acts of worship such as communion, baptism, marriage, infant dedication and funeral services.

In taking this course, participants will visit and review in relation to history, theology, movement, rhythm, symbol, and various acts, a worship service from a Christian tradition other than their own.

Christian Leadership

Christian Leadership

‘Leadership – what is it? How do you do it? Who is a leader? Who is not?’
(Walter Wright, Relational Leadership, xi, 2000).

This module introduces the core issues of Christian leadership as exercised within a variety of ministry contexts. Models of leadership derived from a variety of sources including the Bible, business and the voluntary sector will be considered. A variety of leadership styles will be examined and evaluated for their potential usefulness in pastoral ministry.

You will be helped to consider the pitfalls and challenges of church pastoral leadership and how these can be anticipated with compensating strategies. There will be discussion of leadership integrity, particularly the personal qualities of a leader in a faith community and whether it is possible to lead others in ways the leader has not attained. This will allow for consideration of what it means to lead within an ethical framework, ethics applying both to the leader and the practice of non-manipulative leadership.

Through case studies you will explore the challenges of Christian leadership in a faith community, exploring how to grow as a leader in skills and effectiveness. The course will offer the opportunity to critically reflect on the challenges of leadership in situations such as church meetings (business, deacons’, ministry team, etc.), the leader as exemplar in worship, pastoral care, relational integrity.

Level 9 (Degree)

Tuition Fee £5450/year

On this level, students are encouraged to think more critically and creatively from a number of perspectives.

Students use and develop existing knowledge to explore complex themes and issues. In a fractured world, what does the Sermon on the Mount have to say today? Why does reconciliation lie at the heart of Christian faith and practice? How can we sustain a ministry of caring and leadership, within and beyond the Church? Using the Bible and learning to interpret it responsibly, engaging in theological reflection and work based learning experience, pursuing ethical enquiry and pastoral insight, students are accompanied in a learning process that seeks to be transformative both of them and the wider community.

Module Module price / Audit Price Start Date Levels

Baptist Identity

Baptist Identity

This module will identify significant developments in Baptist history in relation to: Continental Anabaptism, British, Scottish, European, and Global developments. This will inform you of the radical tradition that emerges out of a Baptist committment to Christ, the Bible and the Free Church tradition.

In giving attention to significant events and personalities you will get the opportunity to engage with a limited number of source texts.

In turn participants will explore a number of Baptist convictions and practices emerging from this Free Church tradition of living under the ‘rule of Christ’. These include:

  • the believers’ church
  • believers’ baptism
  • communal discernment
  • mission and evangelism
  • freedom of religion
  • and dissident and prophetic engagement

Such topics will be considered in relation to embodied examples and practical implications not least in relation to the British and in particular Scottish Baptist context of church life.

Spiritual Development

Spiritual Development

This Module explores Christian Spirituality from a number of perspectives. It does so by enabling the student to engage with the theological and practical dimensions of the Christian Spiritual tradition.

The nature of Spirituality is explored by examining biblical principles, surveying historical movements and identifying modern influences.

The dynamics and disciplines of the spiritual life, as expressed in the Christian tradition are then explored with worksheets, lectures, seminars and group work, so that you learn at both a theoretical and practical level.

Spiritual disciplines and their contribution to personal growth are studied, and these include:

  • meditation
  • spiritual direction
  • self-examination
  • worship
  • prayer
  • intercession
  • solitude
  • listening to God
  • the dark night of faith
  • discipline
  • suffering and service

The relation between spirituality and justice and social ethics will also be explored.

Reconciliation

Reconciliation

Christian approaches to reconciliation seek to balance theology and ethics, convictions and practices. In a fragmented and unequal world, increasingly affected by forces of globalisation, the practices and processes of reconciliation are mediating, informed by justice, and intentionally peaceful. Such approaches for Christians are rooted in theological convictions about the story of God as told in the Christian Scriptures, and as embodied in the lives of Christian people and communities.

In this module you will be exploring key theological and ethical concepts such as reconciliation and justice, conflict and peacemaking, exclusion and inclusion of friend and enemy, offence and forgiveness, difference and the definition of ‘the other’.

The module seeks to earth such concepts in practices and embodied examples of individuals and communities such as Martin Luther King, Desmond Tutu and the Truth and Reconciliation process, and Mennonite peacemaking.

Throughout the module the theology and practices of reconciliation are applied to political, church and community contexts, informed by biblical and theological ethics, Baptist theology and contemporary reflection on mission.

Work Based Learning and Christian Leadership

Work Based Learning and Christian Leadership

Work Based Learning is a crucial element in formative and academic training.

This level 9 Module focuses on issues of leadership within a faith community, normally though not exclusively a local church congregation.

It is a block Placement normally five weeks in duration, and is undertaken within the overall guidelines and policies of the SBC relating to WBL.

A Learning Agreement is negotiated between student, Module Co-ordinator and the College approved WBL Supervisor. Aspects of leadership are identified, aims and objectives of the WBL experience formulated, and assessment content agreed and approved at the outset of the Placement.

Students on this WBL have the opportunity to:

  • apply previous learning in a vocational context
  • reflect theologically on their own and others’ experience
  • accompany and interact with a practicing professional in a local faith community environment, and begin to understand the practice, dynamics and key issues of ministry and leadership in a local church or similar context.

The Sermon on The Mount

The Sermon on The Mount

The general aim of this module is to develop and sharpen critical skill in the reading and explanation of biblical texts.

The biblical material, in this instance is the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew chapter 5 – 7). It will be explored by interacting with a number of exegetical and hermeneutical perspectives, including historical critical method, theological reading, ethical exegesis and the history of interpretation. The goal is to instil an ethic of reading that allows for differing viewpoints, yet enables and guides you, the student, to independent and evidence-based conclusions which are drawn from conversation and discussion within class, from secondary literature and further insight arising from your own study and experience.

The content, context, genre and canonical significance and interconnections of the text will be considered, moving towards an informed overview from which responsible interpretation can be attempted.

Creative Homiletics

Creative Homiletics

Preaching is not a fixed form but a dynamic and developing art.

This module will help you explore a number of contemporary approaches to homiletics (the theory of preaching) variously influenced by cultural, theological, and communicative concerns in order to ‘negotiate a hearing’ with listeners.

The various approaches considered include:

  • narrative preaching
  • collaborative preaching
  • trouble and grace preaching
  • moves and structures
  • preaching as performance
  • preaching as a ‘Word Against the Powers’
  • preaching as and to women
  • out-church preaching

In exploring these approaches the integrated relationship of exegesis, hermeneutics, and homiletics will be highlighted as will the difference between inductive and deductive preaching.

You will be given the opportunity to experience examples of some of these approaches, to take part in practical workshops, to critique a particular approach, and to present a sermon for peer and tutor formative feedback in another style, prior to its submission with commentary for summative assessment.

Students undertaking this module will have an opportunity to participate in some innovative performance exercises and take part in some street reading and interpretation of Scripture.

Christian Mission

Christian Mission

‘mission remains an indispensable dimension of the Christian faith and that, at its most profound level, its purpose is to transform reality around it’
(David Bosch, Transforming Mission, 1998, xv).

This module will introduce students to the ways in which the Christian community has historically understood and practised mission with a view to enabling the development of appropriate mission strategies relevant to the emerging shape of diverse local cultures in the 21st century. Biblical and theological perspectives combined with insights from the social sciences will provide a matrix through which a range of contemporary expressions of Christian mission may be articulated so as to form the basis for practical outcomes in a local church context.

The class will help students to:

  • understand the nature of cultural change in relation to the missional opportunities of contemporary culture
  • identify both traditional and innovative models of mission and explain how each may function in relation to diverse historical and cultural contexts
  • develop skills in cross-cultural theological reflection through an understanding of contemporary missional initiatives in the global north

Old Testament Exegesis

Old Testament Exegesis

This module will supplement other biblical modules by focusing on the Old Testament texts, particularly the theologically and spiritually influential texts of the Hebrew Bible.

A particular feature will be the focus on theological exegesis as an increasingly significant approach in contemporary biblical interpretation. This will include the history of interpretation of the text as well as the theological, liturgical and spiritual importance of the text in the life of the church. Major Christian treatments will be considered as well as representative modern critical scholars.

Throughout the course there will be a detailed study of representative texts in their various forms, with time for wider class discussion and theological reflection on human experience as explored within the Old Testament.

The student will therefore develop skills in theological reflection, contemporary hermeneutics and scholarly engagement with the Old Testament, and appropriation of ancient text as applied in contemporary experience.

Level 10 (Honours Degree)

Tuition Fee £5450/year

The Honours year provides the opportunity to integrate learning and increase confidence in exploring, discussing, formulating, defending, and revising arguments. Work Based Learning continues to be a key feature, with students choosing an area of personal development to form the basis of their placement. The dissertation encourages students to explore an area of personal interest through sustained reading, research and writing.

Module Module price / Audit Price Start Date Levels

Dissertation

Dissertation

The Dissertation gives students an opportunity to carry out a piece of supported research in an area of academic and vocational interest.

It is a double module extending over two semesters that requires you to research and write a 10,000 -15,000 word Dissertation on a topic of your choice although guided by Academic staff as to its suitability and achievability.

The process involves the preparation of a proposal which includes a chosen provisional title, brief abstract, some indicative Bibliography and provisional indication of chapter contents.

The Dissertation gives you the opportunity to demonstrate research skills, utilize a range of resources in the library and from the Internet, give evidence of analytic and critical thinking, and the capacity to integrate and apply previous learning.

You will be expected to work independently and use your own initiative; however the project is supported by supervision and peer review seminars.

Spiritual Development

Spiritual Development

This Module explores Christian Spirituality from a number of perspectives. It does so by enabling the student to engage with the theological and practical dimensions of the Christian Spiritual tradition.

The nature of Spirituality is explored by examining biblical principles, surveying historical movements and identifying modern influences.

The dynamics and disciplines of the spiritual life, as expressed in the Christian tradition are then explored with worksheets, lectures, seminars and group work, so that you learn at both a theoretical and practical level.

Spiritual disciplines and their contribution to personal growth are studied, and these include:

  • meditation
  • spiritual direction
  • self-examination
  • worship
  • prayer
  • intercession
  • solitude
  • listening to God
  • the dark night of faith
  • discipline
  • suffering and service

The relation between spirituality and justice and social ethics will also be explored.

Reconciliation

Reconciliation

Christian approaches to reconciliation seek to balance theology and ethics, convictions and practices. In a fragmented and unequal world, increasingly affected by forces of globalisation, the practices and processes of reconciliation are mediating, informed by justice, and intentionally peaceful. Such approaches for Christians are rooted in theological convictions about the story of God as told in the Christian Scriptures, and as embodied in the lives of Christian people and communities.

In this module you will be exploring key theological and ethical concepts such as reconciliation and justice, conflict and peacemaking, exclusion and inclusion of friend and enemy, offence and forgiveness, difference and the definition of ‘the other’.

The module seeks to earth such concepts in practices and embodied examples of individuals and communities such as Martin Luther King, Desmond Tutu and the Truth and Reconciliation process, and Mennonite peacemaking.

Throughout the module the theology and practices of reconciliation are applied to political, church and community contexts, informed by biblical and theological ethics, Baptist theology and contemporary reflection on mission.

WBL and Personal Development

WBL and Personal Development

Work Based Learning is a crucial element in formative and academic training. This level 10 Module allows you to reflect on your learning and training so far, enabling you to identify key areas for further development. It is a block Placement normally five weeks in duration, and is undertaken within the overall guidelines and policies of the SBC relating to WBL.

The Learning Agreement is negotiated between student, Module Co-ordinator and the College approved WBL Supervisor. Through discussion you will be encouraged to identify your own learning and training requirements, looking to previous learning and WBL experience. Aims and objectives of the WBL experience are then formulated, and assessment content agreed and approved at the outset of the Placement.

Students on WBL have the opportunity to apply previous learning in a vocational context, to reflect theologically on their own and others’ experience, to accompany and interact with a practicing professional in a local faith community environment, and through the WBL experience, begin to understand the practice, dynamics and key issues of ministry and leadership in a local church.

Through the submission of weekly theologically reflective Journal entries students will receive regular formative feedback encouraging them to develop their learning through reflection and allowing entries to be developed prior to submission for summative assessment. Students will also be expected to read an appropriate but yet ‘angular’ text in relation to what they are doing with the default books being either Bonhoeffer’s ‘Discipleship’ or Caputo’s ‘What Would Jesus Deconstruct?’

The Sermon on The Mount

The Sermon on The Mount

The general aim of this module is to develop and sharpen critical skill in the reading and explanation of biblical texts.

The biblical material, in this instance is the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew chapter 5 – 7). It will be explored by interacting with a number of exegetical and hermeneutical perspectives, including historical critical method, theological reading, ethical exegesis and the history of interpretation. The goal is to instil an ethic of reading that allows for differing viewpoints, yet enables and guides you, the student, to independent and evidence-based conclusions which are drawn from conversation and discussion within class, from secondary literature and further insight arising from your own study and experience.

The content, context, genre and canonical significance and interconnections of the text will be considered, moving towards an informed overview from which responsible interpretation can be attempted.

Old Testament Exegesis

Old Testament Exegesis

This module will supplement other biblical modules by focusing on the Old Testament texts, particularly the theologically and spiritually influential texts of the Hebrew Bible.

A particular feature will be the focus on theological exegesis as an increasingly significant approach in contemporary biblical interpretation. This will include the history of interpretation of the text as well as the theological, liturgical and spiritual importance of the text in the life of the church. Major Christian treatments will be considered as well as representative modern critical scholars.

Throughout the course there will be a detailed study of representative texts in their various forms, with time for wider class discussion and theological reflection on human experience as explored within the Old Testament.

The student will therefore develop skills in theological reflection, contemporary hermeneutics and scholarly engagement with the Old Testament, and appropriation of ancient text as applied in contemporary experience.

Trinity and Community

Trinity and Community

This module engages in depth with the historical development and the contemporary revival of theological interest in Trinitarian theology. The doctrinal development in the 4th Century and it’s reinterpretation within the late 20th Century re-appropriation of Trinitarian thought is examined by engaging with several key figures.

The focus of the module is the influence and application of Trinitarian theology on the nature and dynamics of Christian community. The class will reflect on how faith in the Triune God enriches our understanding of such human experiences as participatory relationships, equality and inclusion, and self and otherness.

To help with this focus one or two contemporary theologians will be examined, from such representative figures as:

  • T. F. Torrance
  • Miroslav Volf
  • John Zizioulas

Christ and Church

Christ and Church

This course is based on the relationship between Christ and Church. It will attempt to help students formulate a theology of the Church’s witness, service and worship, through an exploration of that relationship. The question ‘Who is Jesus Christ for today’s world?’ will lead to some critical reflection on how the Church has thought of Jesus in the past and into the present. The question ‘What is the Church called to be today?’ likewise depends on how the Church thinks of and represents Jesus Christ in its life and mission today.

In this study of Christ and Church you will explore and discuss significant questions about:

  • what it means for the church to be called the ‘Body of Christ’
  • the nature of Christian service within and beyond the community of faith
  • the content of the Church’s message in the context of our times, including the scandal of particularity that accompanies Christological claims
  • the Church as the embodiment of Christ, its physical reality in the world, and its spiritual reality as the Body of Christ.